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Established 16/3/2000

Spike star Tara and the M3 Toll MotorwaySpike star

Press release

The letter that follows this statement has been issued by leading archaeologists and historians to express their concerns regarding the National Road Authority’s (NRA) plan to construct a section of the M3 toll-motorway through the Tara-Skreen valley. These concerns have been raised on a number of occasions and in different fora by Irish, British, European and American academics and have been vindicated in the past week following the publication of the NRA's reports on its hurried programme of archaeological test-trenching of this section of the motorway corridor.

The points continually raised by these leading academics may be summarised concisely as follows:

Test trenching for the M3 at Tara

Aerial view looking northwards from Rathmiles (centre left) towards the proposed route of the M3 toll-motorway and major interchange (mid-top right). Click for larger photo. Credit: NUI Galway

ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL INVESTIGATION OVER THE PAST 10 YEARS HAVE CONCLUSIVELY DEMONSTRATED THAT WHAT WAS UNDERSTOOD TO BE TARA IN ANTIQUITY CONSISTS OF THE HILL AND ITS HINTERLAND.

• THIS AREA IS RECOGNISED, BOTH NATIONALLY AND INTERNATIONALLY, AS A LANDSCAPE OF EXTREME IMPORTANCE.

• THE NRA’S TESTING AND PROPOSED PROGRAMME OF RESCUE/SALVAGE EXCAVATION IS NOT PART OF AN INTEGRATED RESEARCH DESIGN, WHICH SHOULD BE A STANDARD PREREQUISITE IN SUCH CULTURALLY SENSITIVE LANDSCAPES. THE NRA IS NOT AN ARCHAEOLOGICAL AUTHORITY, ITS PRIMARY FUNCTION IS TO BUILD ROADS. ITS REMIT, THEREFORE, IS NOT TO DICTATE NATIONAL STANDARDS IN ARCHAEOLOGICAL PRACTICE BUT RATHER TO FOLLOW THEM.

• THE ACADEMICS WHO HAVE SIGNED THE ATTACHED LETTER AND OTHERS ARE FULLY AWARE OF THE ECONOMIC NECESSITIES OF THE NATION AND FULLY SUPPORT THE IMPLEMENTATION OF NECESSARY INFRA-STRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENTS IN A RESPONSIBLE, TRANSPARENT AND ETHICAL MANNER. THEY ARE NOT OPPOSED TO THE CONSTRUCTION OF THIS ROAD, BUT ARE CALLING FOR ONE SECTION OF IT TO BE RE-ROUTED AWAY FROM TARA.

• WHAT THEY AND OTHERS QUESTION IS THE NEED TO SACRIFICE EXCEPTIONAL ELEMENTS OF OUR HERITAGE WHEN EQUALLY SENSIBLE AND VIABLE SOLUTIONS CAN BE FOUND, IF THE AUTHORITIES ARE PREPARED TO GENUINELY LISTEN.

For additional information see: http://www.nuigalway.ie/archaeology/Tara_M3.html


Spike star JOINT-LETTER: Tara and the M3 toll-motorway Spike star

Dear Sir,
Tara is under threat. The National Roads Authority continues to perpetuate the fiction that Tara is confined to the cluster of monuments on the hilltop. This is not the case. The hilltop is but one element of what our ancestors understood Tara to be in antiquity. The hilltop is part of a wider, integrated, archaeological and historical landscape. That part lying to the eastern side of the hilltop was especially important in prehistoric times and subsequently, in the early historic period, it became the royal demesne of the kings of Tara.

The planned route of the M3 toll-motorway and major floodlit interchange at Blundelstown, (lying little more than 1.5km from the ‘Banqueting Hall’ on the hilltop) will cut through the heart of this exceptionally sensitive landscape. In so doing it will irreparably damage the cultural integrity of this nationally and internationally significant archaeological complex. The construction of housing and industrial estates that will inevitably follow in its wake will destroy Tara’s environmental context forever.

It was acknowledged as early as 2000 in the N3 Navan to Dunshaughlin Route Selection report and reiterated in the Environmental Impact Statement (2002) that "this section of the M3 runs through one of the richest and best-known archaeological landscapes in Europe". Ironically, this is once again confirmed by the recent announcement from the NRA that test trenching along the proposed route between Navan and Dunshaughlin alone has uncovered no fewer than 28 archaeological sites and major complexes. This news, though alarming, is entirely as predicted by experts researching Tara. As usual, one can expect yet further discoveries in advance of road construction. Irrespective, however, of the large numbers of monuments, the destruction of this intact archaeological landscape is too great a price to pay should this development proceed as planned.

We are not opponents of progress and development, but sometimes, in exceptional circumstances, it is necessary to question and reconsider major development decisions. The case of Tara is just such an exception. Are we in danger of repeating the same bitterly regretted mistakes as were made at Stonehenge? In that instance a major road has to be replaced by a tunnel, at enormous expense, in an attempt to ameliorate the irreversible damage inflicted on Britain’s foremost archaeological monument and cultural landscape.

In the case of Tara and the M3 there are viable and realistic alternatives where both infrastructure and heritage can be successfully accommodated (without requiring a tunnel). Tara is the crossroads at which we should pause to reflect on the direction we, as a nation, choose to take with regard to our unique and valuable heritage. We cannot afford to get it wrong.

Yours, etc.
Dr Edel Bhreathnach, Micheál Ó Cléirigh Institute, University College Dublin.
Mr Charles Doherty, Early Irish History, School of History, University College Dublin.
Professor George Eogan, PhD, D.Litt, (Dublin).
Mr Joe Fenwick, Department of Archaeology, National University of Ireland, Galway.
Dr Elizabeth FitzPatrick, Department of Archaeology, National University of Ireland, Galway.
Professor Dennis Harding, MA, DPhil, FRSE, Abercromby Professor of Archaeology, University of Edinburgh.
An tUasal Seamus Mac Gabhann, editor Ríocht na Midhe (Journal of the Meath Archaeological and Historical Society), National University of Ireland, Maynooth.
Dr Finbar McCormick, School of Archaeology and Palaeoecology, The Queen’s University of Belfast.
Mr Conor Newman, Department of Archaeology, National University of Ireland, Galway.
Professor Máirín Ní Dhonnchadha, Scoil na Gaeilge, National University of Ireland, Galway.
Professor Dáibhí Ó Cróinín, Department of History, National University of Ireland, Galway.
Professor Etienne Rynne, MRIA, FSA, (Galway).
Professor Alfred Smyth, Dean of Arts and Humanities, Canterbury Christ Church University College.
Professor Charles Thomas, FBA, Hon MRIA (Cornwall).
Professor John Waddell, Department of Archaeology, National University of Ireland, Galway.
Mr Richard Warner, MRIA (Belfast).
Dr Niamh Whitfield, PhD, FSA (London).
Published in Irish Times, 22 September 2004, and subsequently in other national newspapers]


Click here for the website of Save Tara-Skryne Valley | Charlize Theron joins anti-motorway lobby

Do you have an opinion? | Go to the Hill of Tara section

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